JOHN MALALAS CHRONICLE PDF

First we must acknowledge with gratitude a series of grants in from the Australian Research Grants Scheme which has enabled us to employ research assistance and especially to meet as a group twice a year for concentrated discussions. Next our warmest thanks must go to the University of Melbourne: to its Committee on Research and Graduate Studies for a substantial publication grant; to the Faculty of Arts for a grant which enabled Simon Franklin to visit Australia in to work us on the Slavonic material, and for grants towards the cost ofword-processing; and to the Department of Classical Studies for patient and copious support for word-processing and photocopying. We must also thank the Classics Department of the Australian National University andthe Departments of Greek and of Modern Greek of the University of Sydney for assistance, especially with photocopying. Many people have come to our aid with advice, photocopies of inaccessible material and opportunities for discussion. Brian Parker allowed himself to be mercilessly exploited for translation from Syriac, for which we are very grateful.

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First we must acknowledge with gratitude a series of grants in from the Australian Research Grants Scheme which has enabled us to employ research assistance and especially to meet as a group twice a year for concentrated discussions. Next our warmest thanks must go to the University of Melbourne: to its Committee on Research and Graduate Studies for a substantial publication grant; to the Faculty of Arts for a grant which enabled Simon Franklin to visit Australia in to work us on the Slavonic material, and for grants towards the cost ofword-processing; and to the Department of Classical Studies for patient and copious support for word-processing and photocopying.

We must also thank the Classics Department of the Australian National University andthe Departments of Greek and of Modern Greek of the University of Sydney for assistance, especially with photocopying. Many people have come to our aid with advice, photocopies of inaccessible material and opportunities for discussion.

Brian Parker allowed himself to be mercilessly exploited for translation from Syriac, for which we are very grateful. Our research assistants, Ann Nixon who subsequently joined the translation and commentary team and Suzanne MacAllister, laid the ground-work for the indices. The translation and its subtext have been persistently and cheerfully word-processed in the University of Melbourne by Sue Montague and Trish Dutton while our especial thanks go to Helen Glynatsis.

Ailsa Mackenzie has also provided much advice. We thank the Princeton University Press for permission to reproduce, with minor alterations, the plan of Antioch from G. Downey, A History of Antioch in Syria, We would like to thank Kathie Smith for preparing the final versions of the maps. Finally all of us in the group recognize that collectively we owe more than we can say to our long-suffering spouses and families, who have found themselves living with John Malalas for longer than they expected.

Written at a linguisticlevel that approaches the vernacular, it gives an insight into an average Byzantine s view of the past. Not only is this work fascinating in itself, but it strongly influenced later writers in the genre, which flourished in the Greek-speaking world until the sixteenth century; it also deeply affected the Syriac and especially the Slavonic historiographical traditions.

However, until now, no translation of the whole text has been made into a modem European language, and only a few excerpts have been made available eg the portions of Book 18 translated by Veh, Furthermore, there is no satisfactory text. Until I. Thurn s new edition announced in the series Corpus Fontium Historiae Byzantinae becomes available, one must still have recourse to that ofL.

Dindorf, published in the Bonn Corpus in In Roger Scott in Melbourne and a group of Byzantinists and classicists in Sydney discovered that they had each, working independently, produced versions of Book 18 of Malalas: Roger Scott some years previously for teaching purposes, the others as the programme of a reading group.

Itwas decided to pool resourcesand to tackle the whole chronicle. Books were assigned to individuals, who produced first drafts which were then discussed line by line in a series of meetings.

Since the chronicle has a highly repetitious style, a list of the more common phrases was drawn up and versions agreed upon, which were then imposed as far as possible over the whole chronicle to ensure a consistency of approach matching that of Malalas.

The revised version was circulated for further comment. It quickly became apparent that simply translating Dindorf s often unsatisfactory edition of the unique Oxford manuscript itself long recognised to be, in places, an abbreviation raised more problems than it solved. A decision was taken to face the issue of the lost original and present in a subtext such evidence as could be found for the original version.

The material for the subtext was collected and drafted by Elizabeth and Michael Jeffreys. Simon Franklin worked on the Slavonic texts and presented their evidence in usable form; Brian Parker was cajoled into reading the sections of Pseudo-Dionysios of Tell Mahre not translated by Chabot while Witold Witaboski provided further advice. None of these can be held responsible for any distortions the editors may have perpetrated in using their work.

We have not attempted to present the material in the subtext in Greek, or in whatever language it now happens to be preserved, partly because this would be encroaching on Thurn s territory, partly because of the considerable number of these languages Slavonic, Syriac, Ethiopic, Latin , and partly because we would like this material to be accessible to undergraduate students of late antiquity as well as to specialists.

As so many languages are involved and especially since Malalas Greek is difficult to recover as a result of abbreviation and linguistic correction , there seems positive merit in publishing a kind of edition in translation in some neutral modern language. This will provide a more readable guide to the available evidence on what Malalas wrote than any conceivable edition in the original. The Introduction to this volume is brief. Most space is given to explaining the principles on which the subtext has been compiled and discussing the texts which are used in it.

Further discussion of these issues and on the nature of the chronicle will be provided, and our conclusions on the identity of Malalas and his position in Byzantine society will be explained and defended, in a forthcoming volume, Studies in John Malalas Byzantina Australiensia 6. Other material which has been collected in the course of preparing this translation will be presented later in the form of a commentary. Preface x The roles played by members of the group will also become more apparent in these future volumes.

While everyone has joined in the translation process, our historians are Brian Croke who has written the section on author and genre in the Introduction , Jenny Ferber, Douglas Kelly, Ann Nixon and Roger Scott. Alan James has kept a classicist s rigorous eye on the early material, Douglas Kelly has performed a similar function for the middle books and Roger Scott for the later; Michael Jeffreys has scoured the secondary literature; Ann Moffatt has checked on thereferences to artistic monuments and read the translation in an effort to eliminate undue translationese ; Elizabeth Jeffreys has co-ordinated the multifarious revisions into a coherent whole.

The project has been held together by Roger Scott and Elizabeth Jeffreys, who have also undertaken the editing and production and who, with Michael Jeffreys, must take the responsibility but not the credit for our team s final version. We hope that this volume will not only introduce to a wider audience an unjustly neglected figure in Byzantine cultural history but also act as a stimulus to further work on the chronicle tradition of the ancient and medieval world.

Sobolevskogo, Leningrad, , See New Testament. American Journal ofArchaeology. Amelotti and L. Zingale, edd. Malalas, Chronographia, Book 1; L. Dindorf, ed. Arkhjivskiy khronograf the Archive Compendium , cited from Ist see below. Vil see below.

Oxford, Baroccianus Baldwin, The date of a circus dialogue, REB 39, Beck, Kirche and theologische Literatur im byzantinischen Reich, Munich. Bentley, Epistula ad J. Millium, in Malalas, Chronographia; L. Besevliev, V. Bikerman, Les Maccabdes de Malalas, Byzantion 21, Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies. Malalas, Chronographia; L. Brock, Some Syriac excerpts from Greek collections of pagan prophecies, Vigiliae Christianae 38, Bury, The text of the codex Baroccianus, BZ 6, Byzantinische Zeitschrift.

Cameron, , Cyril of Scythopolis, V. Sabae 53; a note on KaTd in late Greek, Glotta 56, Cameron, , The empress and the poet: paganism and politics at the court of Theodosius II, Yale Classsical Studies 27, Cantarella, Chernysheva, M.

Chemysheva, 0 sootnoshenii slavyanskogo perevoda Khroniki Ioanna Malaly i yeye grecheskogo teksta na materiale portretnoyleksiki , Trudy Otdela Drevnerusskoy Literatury 37, Chil Malalas, Chronographia; E. Chilmead, ed. Chrysos, E. Conybeare, F. Costanza, S. Costanza, Sull utilizzazione di alcune citazione teologiche nella cronografia di Giovanni Malala e in due testi agiografici, BZ 52, CP Chronicon Paschale; L.

CP Classical Philology. Cramer, J. Cramer, ed. Croke, B. Croke, Two early Byzantine earthquakes and their liturgical commemoration, Byzantion 51, Croke and A. Emmett, edd. Meister, ed. Dagron, G. Dagron, Naissance dune capitale: Constantinople et ses institutions de d , Paris. Daniel See Septuagint. Buttner-Wobst and A. Roos, edd. Dihle, A. Dilleman, L. Downey, G. Downey, Q. Marcius Rex at Antioch, CP 32, Dubarle, La mention de Judith dans la litt6rature ancienne, juive et chrdtienne, Revue biblique 66, Evolution de son mythe, BZ 63, MSS: see Tvorogov, , Ensslin, W.

Klasse, published , W. Erbse, H.

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A Monophysite Byzantine chronicler of the sixth century, born at Antioch where he spent most if not the whole of his life. His "Chronographia" if, for which he is famous, was originally but a chronicle of the city of Antioch, expanded later by the author himself into a general history of the world up to the last years of Justinian d. It is divided into eighteen books, the last of which, however, originally a chronicle of Constantinople, cannot be ascribed to John Malalas, being evidently the work of an orthodox writer. Giving up the Hellenic and Byzantine traditions John Malalas struck a new path in historiography, and created the type of the Byzantine chronicle.

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Johannes Malalas - pages Johannes Malalas wrote a chronicle of world history, from the creation up until his own time A. His chronicle is especially valuable for the local information which he preserves about Syria and the city of Antioch. However the chronicle should be used with caution, because it contains many blunders and inaccuracies. Jeffreys, M.

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